Wilson's Warbler

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Image:WilsonsWarbler.JPG

Common Name: Wilson’s Warbler
Scientific Name: Wilsonia pusilla

Size: 3.9–4.7 inches (10-12 cm); Wingspan: 5.5-6.7 inches (14-17 cm)

Habitat: North America; the Wilson’s warbler is a migratory species. It is the only migrant warbler regularly found in tropical high plains. They breed in shrub thickets of riparian habitats, edges of beaver ponds, lakes, bogs, and overgrown clear-cuts of montane and boreal zone. At all seasons, it prefers secondary growth, riparian habitats, lakes, montane and boreal forests with overgrown clear cuts. They winter in tropical evergreen and deciduous forest, cloud forest, pine-oak forest, and forest edge habitat; also found in mangrove undergrowth, secondary growth, thorn-scrub, dry washes, riparian gallery forest, mixed forests, brushy fields, and plantations.

At all seasons, it prefers secondary growth, riparian habitats, lakes, montane and boreal forests with overgrown clear cuts. It is the only migrant warbler regularly found in tropical high plains.

Status: Not Threatened. Global population: Unknown population. There is no special status on federal lists for this warbler. But degradation and loss of primary breeding habitat and western riparian woodlands, are likely to be a leading cause of declines.

Diet: Insects and occasional berries. It picks insects from foliage and twigs, hovers to pick prey from leaves, and often flycatches.

Nesting: It has a plain green-brown back and yellow under parts. The male has a small black cap. The Pacific coast populations have the brightest yellow, even orangish, foreheads and faces. Western-central and Alaskan birds are slightly larger than the eastern and Pacific coast populations.

Wilson’s Warblers are ground nesters. The female creates a bowl of vegetation, lined with grass or hair. It is usually placed on the ground, at the base of a shrub or under bunches of grass. Sometimes, it may be placed low in shrubs.

The eggs are colored creamy white with fine reddish spots on them and usually 2 to 7 eggs are laid. Incubation time is 8 to 13 days.

Cool Facts: The Wilson's warbler was first described in 1811 by the ornithologist Alexander Wilson, who placed it in the genus Muscicapa. The species was moved to Wilsonia by the naturalist and ornithologist Charles Lucien Bonaparte in 1838. Zoologist Thomas Nuttall moved it to Sylvania in 1840, and by 1845, many authors included it in Myiodioctes. In 1899, the American Ornithological Union returned the species to Wilsonia. The species name "pusilla" means "small."


Found in Songbird Remix Woodland Jewels

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